Finding the path to post-desktop email that works

richardcooperch:

This is spot on – my habits as an individual as opposed to a business person are different as discussed.

Originally posted on Gigaom:

Mobile email is taking over. Of emails that are opened, 51 percent are opened on mobile devices, observes Litmus. This is an all-time high. At the same time, webmail opens have dropped by more than a third in the last year, to just 18 percent of opens. Customers want to interact with email at their convenience … wherever they happen to be.

A second change is also at play. While consumers are communicating via text, instant messaging, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and more to accomplish tasks once reserved for email – driving the overall consumer email sent down 4 percent — current predictions have business-oriented emails growing more than 13 percent in the coming years.

Why the discontinuity? Those who predict a wholesale shift away from email to some form of instant messaging miss that these technologies are not the same – especially for the business user. Both are valuable…

View original 795 more words

About these ads

3 thoughts on “Finding the path to post-desktop email that works

  1. I’ve read many posts about the death of desktop email, and this proposes an valid point. However I don’t see Mobile eliminating desktop email usage in anyway, but rather see mobile as a great sidekick to the desktop. Also yes it is true that many people today are enjoying the freedom of working away from “the office”, but when we talk desktop email, that also means laptops. Desktop email clients are very popular for many workers on the go. I’ve observed that many entrepreneurs that work remotely or who travel a lot actually prefer an email client for managing email, info overload and productivity. That is what is so great about native apps for email, there is a lot more control and productivity that can easily be integrated. You also have offline access – very essential for those on the go where a connection is limited. On the road to productivity, that is one of the main issues we see with email on web and mobile, there’s a lot more room for distraction with different web tabs open, toggling back and forth, lack of focus and poorly executed design for the user experience. Something so important when you look at how one interacts with the #1 online activity still today – email. The trend is growing with shorter snippets of “chatting” applications, which are great for that purpose. But when you really want to sit and get something done, you aren’t going to be on your mobile device or chat app…you are still much more likely to be on a desktop computer or laptop. Also cloud service apps are a possibility for integration with desktop email clients as well, further broadening the possibilities for email and a true productivity tool. A quantitative study on email interaction by YesMail reveals that even though 49% of email opens occur on a mobile device of some sort, interaction rates on mobile devices actually fell behind desktop rates by a significant margin. I think this is very important to note.

  2. All good points, I know I mostly open/read/review emails on the go – with iPhone or iPad. When I can’t respond with a simple answers or a quick yes or no I then mark the email as “unread” until I get back to my desktop. On my desktop – with two large monitors, I find it more practical to respond with more details advice which may include doing some research.

  3. …….and on my desktop I am less likely to make errors than on a portable device which is important from a professional point of view. Refer above “detailed advice” not “details advice” Richard!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s